Garden Types - Created Date : 31.7.2019

faith, family, food and frugality

faith, family, food and frugality



faith, family, food and frugality

Mason Jar Monday September 22, 2008

This amazing idea for housing kitchen herbs comes to us from Better Homes and Gardens. I thought it appropriate to share this Mason Jar Monday because it is not only a great idea for mason jars, it is also a great way to keep an herb garden during the coming cold months.

From the BHG website,

“Vintage mason jars are the ideal containers for a kitchen herbarium. They’re inexpensive and attractive, especially on a sunny windowsill, and will provide you with a year’s supply of fresh seasonings.

Almost any herb can be started from seed in a mason jar. Chive, thyme, and rosemary are excellent choices. For each, follow package instructions and keep soil warm, moist, and in full light until seeds have germinated. When they outgrow their space, you can cut them as needed, or transplant them into a larger container or into the garden.”

One reader suggests that these potted plants would make excellent Christmas gifts with a festive ribbon tied around the neck of the jar. What a wonderful inexpensive gift!

So the bottom layer is “activated charcoal” it absorbs water and releases it over time, often used in terrariums. Then soils then rocks to help keep the water down in the soils. It doesn’t need oxygen because its a self sustaining cycle. ??

I love this idea, thanks for sharing. I live in South West Indiana and am only able to grow my herbs outside from June until October. So I freeze everything I can in hopes of making it through the Winter and early Spring. I am going to try this method, hoping I will have fresh grown herbs year round. Thank you again.



What is the best way to replant your lawn?

If you're tired of tanning in your garden, lifeless grass stains or stubborn heaps of crab grass, there may be time to refresh your lawn. There are several ways to regenerate your lawn, but sometimes damage can be too heavy for a quick repair. Destroy your entire garden - lawns and all - for complete regeneration and sprinkle brand new grass seeds on the lawn.

Step 1

Determine whether to install a new series of cold season grass or warm season grass. Cold season grasses - as the name suggests - grow in cold months. Warm season grasses develop well in warmer weather. Your seed selection determines when you need to plant your new seeds. Start sowing seeds in the warm season in early spring and plant seeds in the warm season in early autumn.

Step 2

Kill your old herbs with herbicides. Spray the herbicides directly on the grass. Avoid spraying everything you don't want to die for (trees, bushes and flowers, for example). Begin the destruction of old herbs early, because it may take several weeks for the herbicides to function properly. Read the instructions for herbicide containers carefully before use.

Step 3

Turn the soil 6 inches up in your garden. Use a shovel for small areas. Larger grass areas may require rototiller. A rototiller is a machine specially designed to break up soil. Break up piles of soil larger than your fist.

Step 4

Pour your grass seeds into a manually pushed seed spreader. Bring the seed drill to the corner of the garden and start pushing it slowly and steadily. Walk along a zigzag line in your garden, distributing the seeds evenly across the raised soil.

Step 5

Apply a thin layer of soil over the freshly sown seeds. This helps to protect them from hungry birds and other animals that may try to eat your seeds. Water the lawn with a soft water spray.