Garden Types - Created Date : 23.8.2019

Don't let weeds rob your garden of its beauty—some of these plants cho...

Don't let weeds rob your garden of its beauty—some of these plants cho...



Don't let weeds rob your garden of its beauty—some of these plants choke out the garden plants you've worked so hard to grow. Use our guide to help identify and control these troublesome pests.

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16 Great Patio Ideas

Just like interior rooms, patios benefit from seasonal spruce-ups, new furniture arrangements, and fresh crops of accessories. Take your redesign cue from these 16 patios that illustrate inspirational, on-trend, and achievable redesign strategies.

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Reach into Secluded Spaces

Convert underutilized areas in your landscape into welcoming patios by employing handsome furnishings, vibrant fabrics, and beautifully planted containers. Though this area was designed as a designated patio space, patios can be located anywhere you can create a floor from brick, flagstones, wood chips, or gravel.

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Keep it Cozy

Everyone needs a solitary spot for sharing quiet conversation with a friend or kicking back with a good book. A few cushy chairs and a table for resting drinks and books is all that is required to create a purposeful patio. But, when you arrange those things in a lushly planted garden and add in a water feature, you'll create a charmingly cozy nook that you'll never want to leave.

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Step It Up

Elegant homes call for refined outdoor furnishings. This covered patio formalizes its outlook with a distinctive dining set combining glitzy chairs with a table crafted from a carved base and a glass top. Want to add some sparkle to your patio in a jiffy? Hang a gilded mirror on an exterior wall or fence that's located near your patio. Paint wooden chairs with a decorative metallic finish. Or, turn beautiful outdoor fabrics into cushions and pillows to adorn chairs, chaises, and settees.

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Stylishly Accessorize

Amplify a patio's appeal and function by adding in fetchingly formed accent tables and vivaciously patterned fabrics. Decorate with flowerpots and accessories that suit your design preferences. Choose accessories that stand up to the elements along with items that will look better with weathering.

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Revive and Renew

Grab a paint brush and white paint to perk up time-tired furniture and planter-box finishes. Need new cushions for your patio furniture? Opt for cushions covered in a fabric that advances into view. This homeowner did it right: bright blue cushions trimmed with bright white welting set on white frames make a significant splash.

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Furnish with Flowers

There's no better places than outdoor living spaces for cultivating garden spirit. Ply furnishings with botanical motif fabrics, move in potted geraniums and impatiens, and display accessories with flower shapes. These homeowners went one step further. They repurposed an old work bench to use as a potting station, which ensures they always have fresh blooms within arm's reach.

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Include Modern Convenience

Great-outdoors-loving homeowners cushion cozy nests that they can enjoy from dawn to well past sunset. This family created a finely furnished living room on their covered bluestone patio. Pretty wicker pieces dressed in even prettier fabrics provide comfortable seats for watching the television set mounted on an exterior wall. Want to stretch your patio usage? Consider adding electric lights, stereo speakers, an outdoor kitchen, and/or a fire pit.

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Provide Shade

Poolside patios and their resident patio sitters often suffer from too much sun. Whether your shade-lacking patio sits next to a swimming pool or your back door, consider cutting the sun's glare and improving comfort levels by adding freestanding and table-inset umbrellas that can be adjusted as the sun moves across the sky. Select umbrella fabrics that complement your patio's color scheme. Pick patterned umbrellas fabrics to jazz up the backyard scene.

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Find a Muse

Thinking about redesigning your patio? Take your color cue from your home's exterior to create a calmingly cohesive composition. In this alfresco dining area, the white-ruffled slipcovers and umbrella mirror the color of the home's trim. They pull up to a rustic stone table that echoes the siding's earthen tone. Breezy white cotton slipcovers are a fine choice for outdoor spaces. They can be simply tossed in the washer with bleach and hung in the sun to dry.

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Make it Portable

Consider furnishing your patio with lightweight pieces that you can move from sun to shade or partner with other conversation groupings as needed. Look for pieces with vintage patinas, scintillating silhouettes, and chromatic fabrics so even the smallest objects will mightily contribute to a patio's overall good looks.

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Establish Period Panache

Antique garden furniture and accessories bring sophisticated substance to century-old and brand-new patios alike. Look for garden relics at estate sales, flea markets, and antique shows specializing in vintage garden gear. Designed after French antiques, these reproduction pieces perfectly suit the homeowner's love of European style, while supplying modern function on this stone-paved hilltop patio.



6 Lawn Care Musts for Your Fall Yard

Among lawn care professionals, the best way to achieve thick, green and healthy lawn in spring is to give a well-timed care in autumn - in other words, right now. However, according to Scott Frith, CEO of Lawn Doctor, a lawn care company with more than 200 franchises nationwide, many homeowners make the same basic mistakes before they fall asleep and then cause better performance of their lawn. Wonders. . I wonder more. Here is Frith's seven-step program to get a nice lawn next year.

1. Remove the leaves.

A carpet of colorful autumn leaves can look nice and can be fun to play, but they are not good for your lawn. Blocks light and traps moisture, potentially fatal strokes for unlucky grass beneath. So as the leaves fall, blow or rake them as often as possible. Even after the trees remain bare, continue to remove the corners of the wind. If you don't do this, come on the grass at the bottom of this grassland, the rotting mat will be dead.

2. Continue cutting, but to the correct height.

Don't put that mower away yet. The grass continues to grow until the first hard frost and therefore requires regular cuts to keep it ideally 2 to 3 inches high. If you let it stay too long, it becomes dull and vulnerable to fungi such as snow mold. Cutting grass too short is equally bad because it shortens the root system - the root depth is proportional to the cutting height and prevents the ability of the lawn to withstand cold and dryness in winter. Regular mowing also gets rid of pesky leaves, cuts them and leaves behind a soil-enhancing mulch.

3. Continue watering.

Frith says people tend to stop watering in the fall as the weather gets cold. Lar They think nature will do things for them, or he says. While it is true that there is more rain, more dew and less evaporation at this time of year, this may not be enough to keep the grass roots juicy and healthy in the winter. If your lawn does not receive at least an inch of water per week - the best way to follow a simple rain gauge - then run the sprinklers or irrigation system until the end of October. Until then you will want to remove hoses and flush the irrigation system to prevent frozen pipes and plugs.

4. Loosen the soil.

According to Frith, regular ventilation - every few years, prevents the soil from being compacted and covered with thatch, and a thick layer of roots, stems and debris that prevents water, oxygen and nutrients from reaching the soil. A core aerator corrects both problems by drilling holes in that hole and pulling the earth plug up. "It is a good idea to ventilate a lawn just before fertilization," says Frith. "All these holes in your lawn will allow the manure to reach the roots that it can do best."

5. Add fertilizer.

Just as grass roots need water to last in winter, they also benefit from a shot of plant sugars that protect the roots against frost and give energy to the whole plant to spring back in the spring. These sugars are produced by chlorophyll, which is produced by the grass in abundance when there is enough nitrogen. Frith therefore recommends a slow release of the slow release granular fertilizer 24-0-10. The figures indicate the weight percent by weight of nitrogen, phosphorus and potassium, respectively. Potassium is also important because it helps root growth, disease protection, drought tolerance and cold resistance. (A soil test can tell you how much of your lawn really needs it.) However, be careful about spreading fertilizers near the waterways; they are vulnerable to contamination from the second stream. The Grass Doctor's company policy is to provide a 5-meter buffer wherever there is water.

6. Seed spread.

“A dense lawn also provides good protection against weeds, Fr says Frith. It is therefore important to inspect existing lawns. This not only fills fine stains or bare stains, but also allows you to get to know the last, durable, drought-resistant grass. The best time to fall is autumn, because the ground is still warm, the humidity is higher, the nights are cool and the sun is not that hot during the day. But even then, “over-seeding is one of the most challenging lawn care jobs, Fr says Frith. You cannot simply release the seeds on a lawn and wait for them to wait. They must be in full contact with the soil, remain moist until they germinate, and be sufficiently stable before very cold. Renting a split seeder is a better option than broadcasting, but these machines are notorious for tearing the lawn and making your lawn look like a rake. Frith says the Lawn Doctor's special Turf Tamer power seeder, which injects seeds into the soil, is a less damaging option.