Garden Types - Created Date : 28.8.2019

A helpful yet simple DIY for spring gardeners!

A helpful yet simple DIY for spring gardeners!



A helpful yet simple DIY for spring gardeners!

Every year my hubby and I use few of these in the spring, we use them to water our seed trays, just-up seedlings and house plants. They are so easy to fill, carry and pour, they don't leak or drip back down the spout like watering cans! The other handy thing about them is that you can make one with a super fine/gentle spray by using a small needle and one with a more substantial flow by using a bigger needle. I need one for my house plants so I'll be using a bigger needle for this DIY.

No drips!

Gather what you'll need, I recommend using lighter because you need to

reheat the needle every second time.

The needle I chose

Heat the very end for a few seconds

Pierce the milk bottle lid, being careful not to get your fingers in the way! Reheat and repeat, remember

you can always add more holes after if there isn't enough water coming out.

You might look at your needle when your done and be cursing me but its OK just heat the needle again and wipe it on some card or paper a few times and it'll be back shiny and clean!

This is what mine looked like when I was done

Perfect for small house plants :)

We keep a 3ltr one in the greenhouse with a finer spray and this one in the kitchen, they last forever and when the bottle does get a bit old, just swap the lid to a new one! We go through so much milk in our house, I love it when we can re-use the bottles ourselves instead of sending them away to be recycled.

Happy spring gardening :)

***Edit/Addition Feb 2017***

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No problem Christina/Tiffany :) It really is a great one for kids, less splashes than a watering can. Its so fun to hear people are making these all over the world now. I love your marble run idea by the way, I'll be making them for my pre school class for sure!

Great minds think alike! Personally I'd worry about the laundry chemicals damaging the plants but I suppose after a good wash there wouldn't be much in it. Does your daughter still make them, that'd be cool!

Oh, that's a great idea! My 4-yo borrows my watering can all the time to "water" his toys, the driveway, etc. This weekend I'm going to make him his very own watering can out of a laundry detergent jug. Thanks for the inspiration!

So I tried this but I may not be as crafty as you are because my water just dribbles down instead of coming out nicely shower-style! Any ideas what I did wrong? It seems that it gasps for air after a little while too, do you have that problem? Love the idea, though, and I can't wait to get it right! I just started gardening on my apartment balcony and need a good watering can :)Thanks!!

I am interested in her idea as well, this is the exact problem I have with using watering cans - either it drips out of the threads on my store-bought version or it dribbles down the bottom of the lid. I'm going to try the heated needle, because I think it might be the size of the holes. Did you use a small needle? I notice she has a fairly thick one.

Hi philippa, thanks for your comment id say though if you wanted the water to come out much faster or more forcefully than in the picture id recommend just pouring it out gently and save yourself the hassle lol if you're watering things altogether and would prefer a continuos flow id make a mall breathe hole like mentioned below but the size of the container and the holes are really for seedlings and little plants that need a gentle spray.

- Having the holes too close together because then the water can 'stick together' and dribble down. - Having holes too small then the water comes too slowly and so it has time to 'stick together' - Not heating the needle is a big one, if you heat the needle and it melts through it creates a smooth surface for the water to shoot out of but if you just pierce it you create a hole with a (microscopic) rough edge which will encourage the water to cling to it and then dribble down

I hope these tips help, probably should have put them in the main post... Let me know how you get on :)

P.S Val, since mine's for indoor pots i just hold it upright after each pot and it sucks in the air, if you wanted to have a continuos stream just melt a small breathe hole at the top of the handle. Good luck with your balcony garden!

Thanks so much for the extra tips here! I made one of these several years ago, and it dribbled and made a mess. I see where I went wrong given your tips here. I might have to try again given the season for starting seeds!

Thank you so much for this helpful tip. I didn't have a spare needle, so I used a couple of push pins and a lighter. It did sort of melt the bottom plastic of the push pin, so I had to be careful not to touch it. I put the milk cap on one of my kids' bibs so I just had to punch the lid with the push pin. It works great! I noticed too that if I squeeze the jug a little, I can increase the water pressure. THANK YOU!

Thanks for posting. I have an anti-deer/rabbit mixture that I was spraying on my plants to keep them from being mauled by my neighborhood deer & rabbits, but the sprayer kept getting clogged. I usually make the solution in milk jugs anyway, so all I would need to do is screw on the cap with holes and then replace the cap when storing the solution.

I have tried doing this, my problem with it, is when I want to water my garden the bottle acted as though it wasnt getting the oxygen pushing down to let the water come out without GULPING. it would pour GULP pour GULP, making it difficult, do you have any tips to prevent this?

Hi MelieMel, My initial thought is that there is too much water coming out, it shouldn't gulp... Maybe try fewer holes or it might be the bottle, is it flexible? our milk bottles sink in at the sides so you only have to let it take air once in a while. More a dripping problem heres what i wrote before- Having the holes too close together because then the water can 'stick together' and dribble down. - Having holes too small then the water comes too slowly and so it has time to 'stick together' - Not heating the needle is a big one, if you heat the needle and it melts through it creates a smooth surface for the water to shoot out of but if you just pierce it you create a hole with a (microscopic) rough edge which will encourage the water to cling to it and then dribble downhope that helps x

Thanks for the great idea! It's much more elegant than my original plan to hack a hole in the top with a box knife, lol. I shared your post on my own fledgling blog at http://theexperimentalgarden.blogspot.com/2013/09/milk-jug-watering-can.html :)

Hi - just came across this post, and I love it! I run a not-for-profit organisation called The Greening Project in perth, WA where we connect kids with nature through growing plants from seed to create gardens of happiness! I have been battling with getting the watering system they use - good old watering cans are a bit rough on newly-planted seeds and seedlings. This is a great idea for them to get the gentle waterflow happening! Thank you! :) For Your Interest: www.thegreeningproject.org :) and p.s. I'm an ex-Saffie too! x

Hi Mercy! Hmm thats a odd one, is the container very strong? As in its hard to squeeze or press the sides in? If so that would stop it flowing nicely :( the bottle I used is quite thin plastic so when tipped the sides can dip in as the water flows out - I hope that makes sense! x

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What is the best way to replant your lawn?

If you're tired of tanning in your garden, lifeless grass stains or stubborn heaps of crab grass, there may be time to refresh your lawn. There are several ways to regenerate your lawn, but sometimes damage can be too heavy for a quick repair. Destroy your entire garden - lawns and all - for complete regeneration and sprinkle brand new grass seeds on the lawn.

Step 1

Determine whether to install a new series of cold season grass or warm season grass. Cold season grasses - as the name suggests - grow in cold months. Warm season grasses develop well in warmer weather. Your seed selection determines when you need to plant your new seeds. Start sowing seeds in the warm season in early spring and plant seeds in the warm season in early autumn.

Step 2

Kill your old herbs with herbicides. Spray the herbicides directly on the grass. Avoid spraying everything you don't want to die for (trees, bushes and flowers, for example). Begin the destruction of old herbs early, because it may take several weeks for the herbicides to function properly. Read the instructions for herbicide containers carefully before use.

Step 3

Turn the soil 6 inches up in your garden. Use a shovel for small areas. Larger grass areas may require rototiller. A rototiller is a machine specially designed to break up soil. Break up piles of soil larger than your fist.

Step 4

Pour your grass seeds into a manually pushed seed spreader. Bring the seed drill to the corner of the garden and start pushing it slowly and steadily. Walk along a zigzag line in your garden, distributing the seeds evenly across the raised soil.

Step 5

Apply a thin layer of soil over the freshly sown seeds. This helps to protect them from hungry birds and other animals that may try to eat your seeds. Water the lawn with a soft water spray.